Making the world read, One story at a time, Inspiring a generation, One soul at a time.

Reset.Default Settings *Happiness*

5

In my pursuit of happiness and finding a sense of personal fulfillment I decide to go on a small mission that I’ve been procrastinating for the past six months now. The modern Maasai and their contentment with life.

By now we all know that the Maasai are the Poster children of Kenya and the tribal Africa in general, Wakanda forever 😄.

They’re found at southern Kenya and Northern Tanzania. You hear the word Maasai you see Men jumping and beautiful women shrugging their shoulders.

On your way to town from Nyali at the buxton Malindi stage you’ll see some Maasai guys with strands of hair on their hands.

In the evening after work I decided to pay them a short visit . Luckily I come across one and I tell him about my happiness project. He is hesitant at first and I tell him the project will help a lot and he’ll be a part of it. He gives me a look of approval and we sit down for a chat.

He is 28 years of age and he introduces himself as Yakobo. Yakobo used to be a cattle herder in his hometown a small village off Arusha Tanzania . He had his formal education in Tanzania but he decided to come to Kenya to look for greener pastures.

He ended up working as a hairdresser after being inspired by a friend and he has been practicing it for the past two years. He tells me the knowledge he got back home from his Moran roots. He tells me he gets his products at Ksh 70 and his price for braiding the famous thin Rasta like dreadlocks ranges from 1000-3000 depending on the preference of his customer.

Apparently there are over 100 guys in buxton who specialize in the same field as him. On a good day he’ll go home with ksh 3000 and most of the days he’ll go home empty handed . I asked him if he ever tried other jobs but he replies that it’s the only one he’s comfortable at. He pays ksh 30 a day and he’s responsible for maintaining the cleanliness of his open hair salon spot. He’s very happy with his work and he tells me it took a lot of courage to leave his hometown to come out here to forge his happiness. I realize he prefers working on his own as he tells me he has a dream of starting his own salon in the area.

Midway through our conversation another Maasai passes by who’s curious of what’s going on, he introduces himself and I notify him about my project,I ask if his willing to share his story and he exchanges a glance with Yakobo communicating with an expression too subtle for me to discern. I tell him that it’s a story that’ll inspire others out there. He sits down takes out his tobacco pours a little on his palm and sniffs it.

He tells me how he helped out another young lady with a school project, he proudly tells me how the girls project was the best and he asks if the story will benefit only me, but I get to convince him that the story will be read by hundreds if not thousands of people who’ll get to know his work. His name is Moses , 53 years of age but he looks 40 , physically strong and he comes across with a good sense of humor.

He has a good demeanor and he portrays a feeling of pride something he flaunts with his posture and a bright smile.

Health is all that matters to him.Moses sells traditional medicines and he owns cattles back at his home in tanga . He tells me he decided to go into this work after he came to work as a watchman only to realize that the money he was making wasn’t enough to sustain his four wives and twenty one children back at home. He tells me one is allowed to marry as many women as the number of cows he can afford. So his option was to become a herbalist a knowledge that is instilled in them from their childhood days. Moses tells me he specializes in head and stomach related illnesses. I ask him what the blood in his jerrycans heals and they all burst out laughing, he composes himself and tells me that it’s a type of tree and it’s never blood, how ignorant I’ve been all along, sigh.

With a broad smile he proudly tells me how you’ll rarely find a Maasai at the hospital getting treated as they all maintain a good healthy living condition. He tells me again it’s hard to find a Maasai convicted of crimes as they keep themselves busy. He asks me to share his story and how he is angered by the copycats (people from other communities) plying their trade.He is worried with the pace at which the world around him is changing. I cut him short by asking him about the famous Maasai aphrodisiac. He bursts out laughing telling me it’s true. He calls it Mburgeri and only found in a specific location during August and November. A small one goes for 3000 and it’s purely natural with no side effects.

He asks for a photo with me and we take one with Yakobo too.

To me these guys are the epitome of contentment, a good path I took in my pursuit of happiness journey, I hope you find something that’ll keep you satisfied and give you a sense of purpose and happiness, don’t stop until you find it, destroy anything that will stop you in your quest to find the ultimate satisfaction, create good vibes and spread it all around.

Be good do good.

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About Author

Just another guy, husband to a beautiful wife, sucker for nostalgia, good things past, better things ahead. Trying to make the world read, one soul at a time. Forging my own path, creating something beautiful. I'm certain you'll want in along the way. So just chip in.

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